Family members can become separated during an emergency. Be prepared by creating a plan for how to reach one another. Establish an out-of-area contact (such as a relative or friend) who can coordinate family members' locations and information should you become separated. Make sure children learn the phone numbers and addresses, and know the emergency plans.
It is an extremely important list in my opinion but dances between the motive. Sometimes it’s hiking, sometimes it’s nuclear bombing and sometimes a fugitive (I even felt Zombie Apocalypse). I think you should set specific scenarios and then try creating a list. For example, a person leaving his home to find a job in a new city or a person who is on a constant move. So you can think about what exactly matters and what does not. We are easily confused homo sapiens, we don’t need a big list of items that may come to our use, we need a list of items we may have forgotten but are very important to us. So, having a scenario-specific list is better. But I do like the list, it made me add a few more items to my almost perfect list.
I think you’re both correct, although you are addressing separate threat levels and emergencies (civil disobedience vs. natural disaster). I keep a basic bag, plus a small box with optionals that can be quickly loaded, depending on the threat. I realize this may take precious seconds, so this is time dependent. I live in the Chicago area, so civil unrest is a greater concern, and my firearms choice reflects this probable eventuality.
A small size generic spray bottle (or two) with a good spray head (that does not leak) and fits on standard size plastic bottle threads can also be handy to direct fluids exactly where you want and reduce usage. Flushing wounds with water or alcohol, squirting metho through a small flame to put fire on something or someone, cleaning stuff you dropped (phone, torch, glasses), flushing eyes, mouth and teeth, ears, nose and other tricky holes, tracking the ration of your water supply one squirt at a time or just misting some water on your face to cool off … if you can spare it 😉
The Wise Food 5-Day bug out bag has an interior space of 10 x 10 x 16 inches, more than enough to store the 5 days of food stuffs, emergency kit, purified water and more that comes with this bug out bag. Add your own change of clothes, rain coat, boots or whatever else you want to take with you and you’ll be the best possible position to transcend the difficulties you face. The bug out kit includes a small but effective stove and all the food is factory sealed and dated including the 5 water pouches.
"description": "When an emergency strikes, be prepared at work or home with the Deluxe 3-Day Emergency Preparedness Kit from the American Red Cross. This kit contains the emergency supplies for one person for 3 days. Supplies include a hand crank emergency radio, water container, and a personal hygiene kit and first aid kit, all contained in a durable back pack with multiple pouches and removable organizer, with room to add your own personal survival gear and apparel.Useful for natural disasters such as Hurricanes, Tornadoes, and Earthquakes.
This is a really good kit. Having real food rations rather than food bars is great.  The only problem is you need to boil water to add to the food packs and the kit doesn’t come with that much water in the first place. Its good to pair this kit with extra water packs. I like the kit over all its a good starter kit for one person. On the downside there isn’t a multi-person version of it so thats why its my #3 Winner.
This is a really good kit. Having real food rations rather than food bars is great.  The only problem is you need to boil water to add to the food packs and the kit doesn’t come with that much water in the first place. Its good to pair this kit with extra water packs. I like the kit over all its a good starter kit for one person. On the downside there isn’t a multi-person version of it so thats why its my #3 Winner.
There’s always going to be the debate of Bugging In v. Bugging Out, and that is really our job as readers and posters to decide which is best for us and determine the situations/scenarios we may be faced with. What degree of societal collapse do we need to see, before we get the heck out of town? Obviously, the more rural your location is, the higher the probability of staying in place will be. One’s health, general level of physical conditioning and age are all factors we need to consider. It’s easy to say “Get into shape,” but the reality is that may not be possible for some of us with long standing health problems. For those of us incapable of increasing our strength or endurance, Bugging Out may be our last option.
Large high quality water resistant backpack.  24 Mountain House food servings. 48 Datrex Water packs. 2 LED lanterns, 2 flashlights, Fully stocked first Aid Kit, 2 Bath wipes, 4 Emergency blankets, 1 Portable stove and cookware, 4 bows and utensils, 4 whistles, 1 Sawyer Squeeze water filtration system, 1 MoraKniv Knife, 1 Ferrocerium rod fire starter, 4 InstaFire tinder. 8 Cyalume Snaplights (glow-sticks).
Canned ready-meals – Canned foods are ideal for a 72-hour emergency kit list because they are designed with a long shelf life. Canned items are inexpensive and available from almost every grocery store. Also, canned foods contain water which is ideal for keeping your food hydrated and long-lasting. You can even eat food directly from the can without an oven.
The LifeStraw Go Water Filter Bottles are an easy way to take clean water on the go, with the two-stage filtration system suitable for up to 1,000 gallons. Sold in a two-pack, the Go Water Filter Bottles remove bacteria, protozoa, and reduces traces of chlorine while also helping to eliminate its bad taste. The BPA-free water bottles have a two-stage filter and we like that the bottles work both as water filtration devices and as regular water bottles. Pros: Unlike the Personal Water Filter, the LifeStraw Go Water Filter allows users to store water to take with them, ideal for times when you’re not remaining near a water source. The filters are replaceable and each bottle includes an attached carabiner for easy carrying. Cons: Like the LifeStraw Personal Water Filter, the Go Water Filter Bottles also require a lot of suction when drinking. Some customers noted that if the bottle isn’t used regularly, the filter stops working. Image courtesy of Amazon
When a disaster strikes, the grocery store can quickly be overwhelmed. This can lead to people becoming panicked and dangerous. Knowing that you have a bug out bag and rations already prepared is a huge relief. Theres no need to have to fight people at the grocery store! Another big plus is that you don’t have to stop anywhere when you are bugging out. You just grab your bug out bags and hit the road.
When a disaster strikes, the grocery store can quickly be overwhelmed. This can lead to people becoming panicked and dangerous. Knowing that you have a bug out bag and rations already prepared is a huge relief. Theres no need to have to fight people at the grocery store! Another big plus is that you don’t have to stop anywhere when you are bugging out. You just grab your bug out bags and hit the road.
That’s true, we do. It’s clear that we can’t carry everything to survive for a year or more on our backs and we count on our stash at point B. If it’s not there, we do the best we can, go to a FEMA camp or die. What are our alternatives? I think that most people will go to point B if they see the problem before it arrives (hurricane) but a surprise nuclear attack on Houston (in my case) would necessitate a quick exit along with everyone else still alive. As to ‘bring it’, I certainly would if a. I had an operational vehicle and b. the roads were clear enough to get around minor obstacles – I don’t and won’t have a two ton or half track at my disposal. If not of if my vehicle becomes untenable along the way, I’ll put on my boots and my BOB and do the best I can. As you say, there are many scenarios.
For example, relatively near me recently there was a village evacuated from their homes for about a week due to a large damn above the village that was looking likely to burst as the damn wall started crumbling the torrential rain had the water at dangerous levels as it was. People who were home were given minutes to get their sh*t and leave while others were in work away from the danger zone and had zero chance to grab anything. For situations like these a mobile phone, charger, radio, batteries for headtorch etc are a completely rational and extremely likely to be heavily used while you get housed in a local community hall, leisure centre or school etc.
We should clarify that this reduced water recommendation is strictly for limiting the weight of your 72-hour kit if you need to evacuate. In many emergency situations, you will not have to evacuate your home and may simply be without power or running water. We recommend storing the maximum amount of drinking water—at least one gallon per person for three days—in your home food storage. Only for emergencies where you need to evacuate do we recommend reducing water weight.

Overall this a great kit which includes so many useful items. Since this kit doesn’t come with full meals and only with food bars, we recommend using this kit in conjunction with separate food rations that we list at the end of this report. Luckily theres a lot of extra room in these bags for you to add more stuff. Keep in mind that this kit doesn’t come with a portable stove.
Disaster preparedness doesn't need to be complicated, but you’ll find that shopping and collecting gear for a DIY bug out bag can prove to be difficult. In many cases, the DIY approach may prove more expensive than necessary, leaving you with items you don’t really need—and shouldn’t waste your money on. Instead of forcing useless items into a bag that won’t hold up, opt for a pre-packed, top-rated bug out bag. 
Don’t just take our word for it: Our credentials speak volumes regarding the services we provide. In addition to being fully licensed and insured, we are members of the North Carolina, Florida, Georgia, and National Pest Management Associations, and we have a QualityPro Accreditation. We are also GreenPro certified in recognition of our work in environmentally-friendly pest control.
×