The idea is that the contents of the bug out bag kit will last long enough for you to get to your long term bug out location where you already have other gear stashed. Or if you don’t have a long term location you would take most of your hunker down kit with you (Eg. extra food rations, generators, camping and hunting gear etc.).  In this report I include bug out bags that are prebuilt and come with the bag itself.
Build Quality – The last thing you want is to be trudging through the windswept landscape trying to escape the oncoming storm surge and have your pack split open and spill your survival gear all over the place. The bug out bag should be made of durable, water resistant nylon and have high quality zippers (waterproof if possible) and double stitching all around. The shoulder straps should be firmly affixed to the bag and be well padded to help absorb the load you’re carrying. And if there’s a waist strap it too should be well-padded and preferably adjustable to accommodate people of different heights.

"description": "Make sure that your family is ready with this 4-Person 3-Day Emergency Preparedness Kit. This overstocked kit contains a premium hand crank radio which has the following features; flashlight, cell phone charger; weatherband radio with a lithium-ion battery; solar panel; ear jack and SOS alarm. The kit naturally includes four sets of emergency and personal hygiene kits along with ample first aid supplies in a zippered pouch. The kit is housed in a convenient and organized backpack that’s ready to go anywhere. Perfect for natural disasters such as Hurricanes, Tornadoes, Earthquakes, and Blizzards.
A bug out bag or a tactical backpack,  is a large, accessible, strong, and convenient backpack that you can personalize the contents for your situation. This is a bag that you want to have ready so that you can grab it at a moment’s notice. The pack should always be packed and stored in an accessible place. You never know when you might be forced to leave your home and have to survive on only what is on your back. Not only will you need a pack you will need good quality boots as well.   To help you find the best bug out bag, we have listed out some things to consider when buying.

SHTF is an acronym that stands for sh*t hits the fan. This means that something drastic has happened, like a natural disaster, financial crisis, or a war has started. This term is generally used for when things go south quickly. The other acronym that is commonly used to signal it is time to pull out your bug out bag is ‘TEOTWAWKI’. This stands for ‘the end of the world as we know it’.
Word that originated in Smithtown East. Used to describe situations in which weird, unusual, extreme, or out of the ordinary things happen. These situations usually occur when you are under the influence of drugs such as marijuana, shrooms, E etc. The word was founded by the 08 class of smithtown east during the "Lost Boy Era." It has since spread through colleges and towns alike.
Denier is the term that is most often used to suggest the strength of the threads in the fabric used to create the pack. And when it comes to the quality of the seams, look for a pack that advertises double-stitched seams if you want a pack that will last longer and holds up against the environmental factors it could be exposed to in the event of an emergency. Ultimately, your pack is an investment in your survival and the contents of the BOB don’t do any good if your pack fails and you can’t carry everything.

What if you forgot to add a change of clothes? Or you find out that the recommended pocket-knife actually sucks? Testing your kit gives you an opportunity to find what you’ve missed and make tweaks that will improve its usefulness. If you packed for an infant but now have a toddler, your needs are going to change. Also, take this chance to check battery life, switch out expired food items, and update your 72-hour kit, as needed.

Bug-out bags are standard kit for most any survival-minded American. These handy lifesaving devices are typically unobtrusive and compact while containing the critical gear you might need to survive a disaster. For those whose circumstances might mandate a more protracted adventure, however, two companies provide the equipment to take this concept to a whole new level.
I like your addition of a bug net. One thing I noticed is that the author correctly says to save space and weight to just pack a tarp. However, where I live, from late May to late September if you don’t pack bug netting, a tent with screens or plenty of bug spray you are going to be itchy, sore and tired from no sleep because you are up all night swatting mosquitoes
People ask if I was in the military. Yeah, but it was 80 lbs and 40 years ago. Special Forces “A TEAM” medic in fact. But I forgot a lot of that. I carried 120 lb rut when we moved out, but about 40 lbs of ammo and grenades on patrol. I have 2 dozen ruts now, from patrol size to major moveout size. I put 80 lbs of cat litter (we have a cat rescue) to practice the other day … and I had a very hard time to get up with it. So I dropped that to 40 and hit the treadmill 3 miles and 3 mph. I will need to do that for awhile before increasing the weight. I’m 220 wanting 180 but at 66 yrs it’s becoming harder to do things. Hips, knees, shoulders, knuckles .. they are all stiff and ache. So I may have to cut back. But to tell someone just bring 12 rounds of ammo …… that’s crazy. Get an AR in 22 cal, the Ruger Takedown fits well in our ruts. 300 rnds of 22lr is light. I have a Glock M22 40 can with a 22 conversion that works great, same for 1911 45 / 22. In reality, it all comes down as to what the threat is perceived to be. CPAP: my new one is 10 oz, and 6 days of rechargeable batteries are 4 lbs. Solar panel or 110 to recharge the batteries. Forget the CPAP = loud snoring and dog tired wakeup.
The majority of Americans feel that a significant natural disaster will occur within the next 25 years. 64% said they believed a significant earthquake would hit. 63% said a significant hurricane and 29% said that a pandemic, such as a super-virus would occur. Nearly 3 out of every 4 people (71%) believe that disaster in our lifetime will be an act of God, not man. With that being said, 55% of Americans believe that a terrorist attack could occur within the next 25 years. 51% believe that a financial collapse could occur while 14% fear a nuclear fallout.
The LifeStraw Go Water Filter Bottles are an easy way to take clean water on the go, with the two-stage filtration system suitable for up to 1,000 gallons. Sold in a two-pack, the Go Water Filter Bottles remove bacteria, protozoa, and reduces traces of chlorine while also helping to eliminate its bad taste. The BPA-free water bottles have a two-stage filter and we like that the bottles work both as water filtration devices and as regular water bottles. Pros: Unlike the Personal Water Filter, the LifeStraw Go Water Filter allows users to store water to take with them, ideal for times when you’re not remaining near a water source. The filters are replaceable and each bottle includes an attached carabiner for easy carrying. Cons: Like the LifeStraw Personal Water Filter, the Go Water Filter Bottles also require a lot of suction when drinking. Some customers noted that if the bottle isn’t used regularly, the filter stops working. Image courtesy of Amazon

How to Make a Bug Out Bag? – If you decide to make your own bug out bag you’ll want to start with a good-sized, water-resistant backpack and then fill it with a combination of food and practical implements that will allow you to transcend any difficulties you’re likely to encounter. You’ll want to include purified water as well as a water filter (in case the emergency has fouled the local water supply), plenty of freeze dried food along with power bars (but no perishables) and things you can use to protect yourself from the wind, cold and any precipitation that may be falling. Which means you’ll want emergency blankets, dry clothes and rain ponchos. You’ll also want to include other practical implements like a compass, tactical flashlight, walkie talkies, multi tool and more.
Regardless of the premise though, these books will be full of action and adventure as the main character navigates the dangers of a country torn by anarchy in an attempt to find his ex-wife and daughter he left behind while fighting the wars in Europe. Here is the cover for the first book: Feral Nation - Infiltration, with the description below. It is available for preorder on Amazon now, and will be released in the Kindle edition and paperback early next month:

Another factor that affects comfort is the pack’s ability to breathe and dissipate the heat that your body generates as you move. The major area where heat builds up when you’re wearing a bug out bag is along your spine. This is why certain models offer a mesh back panel that creates a small gap between your back and the back panel of the bug out bag. Even a small space here can dramatically improve heat loss and help your body stay cool.
The most popular option is the backpack. For adults, it should be of good quality and an ergonomic pack. It’s not so important for children because they will not be carrying their full packs. Look at a military surplus store or at a sporting goods store for a hiking pack. This will help prevent back injuries and increased durability. If your child can carry a backpack with most of what they need in it, this is the best option.

Backpack. One of the more common mistakes for 72-hour kits starts with the backpack. Choose a backpack that has multiple compartments in which you can divide your survival gear. Sifting through an unorganized pack, where everything is jumbled into the same large compartment can be frustrating and time consuming. By subdividing your stuff into different pockets you can access what you need quickly. Amazon has a variety of military-style packs to choose from.
What if you forgot to add a change of clothes? Or you find out that the recommended pocket-knife actually sucks? Testing your kit gives you an opportunity to find what you’ve missed and make tweaks that will improve its usefulness. If you packed for an infant but now have a toddler, your needs are going to change. Also, take this chance to check battery life, switch out expired food items, and update your 72-hour kit, as needed.

Customize this list to what you need for the particulars of your family. There are many other things that you can add to the list that you may find helpful depending on the vehicle you may be able to evacuate in or the modes of transportation you may use, where your planned final stop might be, or whether you have extra bodies to help carry. Use this as a starting point for what you need to do for the basics and expand it as your family needs and as circumstances dictate.
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Every bug out bag should be 100% unique. Sure, there are some basic items that every bug out bag should have (food, lighter, water filter, flashlight, etc.), but you should customize your bag based on where you live, what type of disaster is most likely to occur in your area, and how much weight you can carry over a long distance. Many preppers forget about that last point.
They contain food rations and water as well as first aid gear and much more.  Making the decision to leave your home should be the last resort in an emergency. But if you have to, you’ll want one of these bags. We recommend having bug out rations and even buying extra ration packs and I’ve listed a great deal at the end of this report for food rations.
What to Put in a Bug Out Bag? – If your pre-made bug out bag focuses on tactical and survival gear you’ll need to finish it by purchasing dehydrated meals and other foodstuffs with long shelf lives. If the bag focuses on food you’ll need to supply survival gear such as a flashlight or two, emergency blankets, first aid kit, paracord, EDC knife and other things. If you’re making your own bug out bag read the answer to the next question.

The second book picks right up where Book One left off, with Eric Branson and his new sidekick, Jonathan, getting ready to set sail from south Florida to cross the Gulf of Mexico to Louisiana, where Eric's brother is a deputy sheriff in a rural parish bordering the Atchafalaya River. This second installment of the series gets into a little more of the overall situation in the country, which is a state of chaos due to anarchist riots and terror attacks. Unlike my Pulse and Darkness After series, the problems that arise in this series are human-caused, and not too far removed from reality considering some of the recent happenings in that have been in the news.
Being prepared means you need to test your survival kit. Testing your 72-hour kit is one of the most important parts of emergency preparation. There are countless blogs with opinions on what to pack in your kit, but few mention testing them. Testing your kit periodically—once every 6–12 months—will ensure you’re familiar with your gear and let you solve any issues before they become real problems.
Regardless of the premise though, these books will be full of action and adventure as the main character navigates the dangers of a country torn by anarchy in an attempt to find his ex-wife and daughter he left behind while fighting the wars in Europe. Here is the cover for the first book: Feral Nation - Infiltration, with the description below. It is available for preorder on Amazon now, and will be released in the Kindle edition and paperback early next month:
Every bug out bag should be 100% unique. Sure, there are some basic items that every bug out bag should have (food, lighter, water filter, flashlight, etc.), but you should customize your bag based on where you live, what type of disaster is most likely to occur in your area, and how much weight you can carry over a long distance. Many preppers forget about that last point.
Disaster preparedness doesn't need to be complicated, but you’ll find that shopping and collecting gear for a DIY bug out bag can prove to be difficult. In many cases, the DIY approach may prove more expensive than necessary, leaving you with items you don’t really need—and shouldn’t waste your money on. Instead of forcing useless items into a bag that won’t hold up, opt for a pre-packed, top-rated bug out bag. 

Katie is a Colorado-native, BYU graduated, and most importantly, wife to one and mother to three beautiful boys. She is passionate about sharing her experiences with others - especially about pregnancy, breastfeeding, cooking, and crafts. She is currently training to be a Certified Lactation Educator. She loves spending time with her family and helping others find joy in family life. Read more...

The biggest misconception about bug out bags is the idea that the contents in and of themselves will be enough to keep you alive. The truth is that the contents of your bug out bag are only as good as the individual using them. If you don’t know how to make the most of the contents of your bug out bag or ration them appropriately, they won’t help you survive any more than a firearm without any ammunition. You should always take the time to familiarize yourself with the contents of your bug out bag and feel comfortable using everything so that you’re best prepared when TEOTWAWKI does occur. 
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