Lightweight at only two ounces and rated up to 10,000 gallons, the Sawyer Products Mini Water Filtration System can go the distance without weighing you down. The Sawyer removes 99.99999% of all bacteria, including Salmonella, E Coli and Cholera, as well as protozoa, including giardia. It also filters out 100% of all plastics. Pros: We like that the Sawyer acts as a middle ground option between the two LifeStraws, with the ability to be used as a straw directly into a water source as well as coming equipped with a 16-ounce reusable squeeze pouch to carry water. The Sawyer also screws on to most disposable plastic water bottles, making this an excellent option for international travel. Cons: Customers note that the flow of the Sawyer is slow and wish that the product was sold with a carrying case for all the parts, including the filter plunger. Image courtesy of Amazon


1 discreet stealth tactical bag. 2 Nylon organization bags. 2 HeatStore sleeping bags. 2 Person dome tent. 8 Hand warmers. 5 x 1 litre water purification powder. 2 Litre water storage bags. Folding water container (1 Litre). 2  3600 calorie bars (with 5 year shelf life). 12 4.2 oz water pouches (5 year shelf life). Dynamo AM/FM radio/flashlight/phone charger  165 Piece First Aid kit. 9 Led compact flashlight with 3 AAA batteries.
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Bug-out bags are standard kit for most any survival-minded American. These handy lifesaving devices are typically unobtrusive and compact while containing the critical gear you might need to survive a disaster. For those whose circumstances might mandate a more protracted adventure, however, two companies provide the equipment to take this concept to a whole new level.
The whole point of a bug out bag is that it is ALWAYS packed and ready to go. In a true emergency, you might not have the time to throw those last few items into your bug out bag that you’ll really need. So, the short answer to this question is that the bag should be packed and ready to go at all times. But you should also be careful to regularly check any items in your bag that could expire or need replacement if they’ve been sitting for a while.
Below is a list of necessary items to include in your 72-hour kit in the event of an emergency situation. Be sure to store them in an easily accessible spot (we keep ours in the car along with our emergency car kit). The preparedness mindset is “one is none” (meaning you have no backup) and “two is one” (meaning once you use your extra, you only have that one left). The idea behind this kit is that you have what you need to get through a short-term crisis before you can return home or until you can find shelter and/or help. You don’t need to take your kitchen sink, but where you can, have a backup or a plan if something fails or gets lost.
A Bug Out Bag, also called a BOB, I.N.C.H Bag (I’m Never Coming Home Bag),Get Out of Dodge Bag (GOOD Bag), or 72 Hour Bag is usually designed to get you out of an emergency situation and allow you to survive self-contained for up to 3 days. A lot of people plan their Bug Out Bag to sustain them for much longer than that, but there is always a limit to what you can carry on your back and a 3 day target is a good place to start.
If you have small children and the elderly with you, you might need 2 or 3 changes for accidents and diaper changes. Be sure also to include any extra diapers and diapering equipment you might need. Small children might revert to pre-potty trained days because they might be scared or you can’t make quick potty stops as often as they need them. It might be time to think about a portable potty, too, because restrooms might not be readily available.

Consider your family’s situation. How many people are in your family? Does anyone in your family need special consideration? Allergies? Medicine? Do you have an infant? All of these things will determine what you want to pack in your 72-hour survival kit. Keep in mind that your pack should be as minimal as possible—the more you pack, the heavier your 72-hour kit will be.
A “Bug out bag” (sometimes called a “bail out bag” or “survival bag”) is loosely defined as a backpack-style bag that a person keeps at the ready in case they need to evacuate in a hurry (bug out) due to natural disaster, civil unrest, fire, war or any other similar type of calamity. A bug out bag won’t be much good should a comet the size of Dallas hit the earth but for the type of events listed above it can make the difference between thriving and barely surviving.
Overall this a great kit which includes so many useful items. Since this kit doesn’t come with full meals and only with food bars, we recommend using this kit in conjunction with separate food rations that we list at the end of this report. Luckily theres a lot of extra room in these bags for you to add more stuff. Keep in mind that this kit doesn’t come with a portable stove.
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