Another factor that affects comfort is the pack’s ability to breathe and dissipate the heat that your body generates as you move. The major area where heat builds up when you’re wearing a bug out bag is along your spine. This is why certain models offer a mesh back panel that creates a small gap between your back and the back panel of the bug out bag. Even a small space here can dramatically improve heat loss and help your body stay cool.
Pack personal hygiene products in your backpack such as a toothbrush, deodorant, feminine hygiene products, and wipes. The most important thing to remember is prescription medications for each family member, if necessary. You’ll need these in everyday life, so you don’t pack them away for a disaster. Instead, keep all medication stored in a survival kit in your home. This means you can quickly grab the survival kit in an emergency situation.
BePrepared.com is the world's largest dedicated online marketplace for survival food, water, and gear. They're a complete one-stop shop for everything you need to prepare for emergencies. There's no way to be ready for everything, but BePrepared.com can get you pretty darn close. Preparing for your survival needs in a disaster can seem daunting, but if you follow a simple plan, you'll be prepared before you know it.
If you have a family, you’ll need a 72-hour emergency kit that caters to everyone. You can purchase the cheapest backpack you can find, as the items inside your 72-hour kit are the most important aspect. First, you’ll need a change of clothing for each family member – including an appropriate top that will keep you warm and clean underwear. In the event that disaster strikes, everyone should have clean and fresh clothing in case.
Good list! I have/use my daughter’s old diaper bag for compartmentalized carry. It is the bigger “gym bag” type with adjustable shoulder strap with multiple compartments. Best part is it comes ready for “messes” so each compartment is also waterproofed to keep liquids from going to other areas. Also, was made with carrying stuff around in mind so the strap has a big cushion that fits comfortably on my shoulder when using.
This is a really good kit. Having real food rations rather than food bars is great.  The only problem is you need to boil water to add to the food packs and the kit doesn’t come with that much water in the first place. Its good to pair this kit with extra water packs. I like the kit over all its a good starter kit for one person. On the downside there isn’t a multi-person version of it so thats why its my #3 Winner.
The Wise Food Company 56 Serving kit is an excellent addition to your bug out bags and home hunker down food supply. It includes 28 breakfast and 28 entry servings. The food packs have a 25 year shelf life. One container has enough servings for 1 adult (2 servings per day) for one month. You can buy multiple kits for your whole family. Just add boiling water and enjoy.
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Tip: Like with eating new weird food that you got from the internet, don’t assume you’ll know how to make a shelter with your tarp and rope. Take a night to camp in the backyard and use these supplies to build your shelters so that you’ll have a basic understanding of what you need to do. Trying to set up for the first time in a harsh weather event will make things even worse.

Build Quality – The last thing you want is to be trudging through the windswept landscape trying to escape the oncoming storm surge and have your pack split open and spill your survival gear all over the place. The bug out bag should be made of durable, water resistant nylon and have high quality zippers (waterproof if possible) and double stitching all around. The shoulder straps should be firmly affixed to the bag and be well padded to help absorb the load you’re carrying. And if there’s a waist strap it too should be well-padded and preferably adjustable to accommodate people of different heights.
Best: The most important part of making your 72-hour kits is not that you (the parent) hurry and put them together. It is very important for your children and spouse to help with this process. Include them in purchasing items, planning food, and packing their kits. Complete as much as you can and schedule out the rest along with making a “due date” and family reward for when they’re finished.
Remember that this pack should be prepared and stored somewhere easily accessible and rodent proof. It is also a good idea to review the contents of your pack every 6 months to ensure you have appropriate clothes packed for the season and that your gear and rations are in order. This will help you feel confident that your Bug Out Bag is ready to go at a moment’s notice!

If you have small children and the elderly with you, you might need 2 or 3 changes for accidents and diaper changes. Be sure also to include any extra diapers and diapering equipment you might need. Small children might revert to pre-potty trained days because they might be scared or you can’t make quick potty stops as often as they need them. It might be time to think about a portable potty, too, because restrooms might not be readily available.


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At 70 years young I have survived many natural disasters. These include tornadoes, wild fires, earthquakes and many hurricanes. In each case the “government” did NOT show up within 72 hours! That is why I never recommend a 72 hour BOB. My personal BOB is packed with enough light weight food to last two weeks. To accompany these provisions I always carry snare wire and a light weight fishing kit. I also carry at least two books, a wild edible foods guide and a book on medicinal wild plants and how to prepare them. All of these should be used from day ONE. Reserve the food you carry in your BOB for those unlucky days when you can find nothing else to eat. You WILL last a lot longer if you do and you will not starve to death.
If you’re having to be outside, fire can be a great way to warm you, to cook your food or even be a signal. Keep a couple of different kinds of fire starters in different areas of your pack, safely protected from the elements, so that you can always have a fire. You’ll also have to think about portable cook stoves if you won’t be able to start a full fire in order to cook your food.
As important as the size of the pack you choose is the comfort of the pack. Many of the packs that we reviewed have compression straps, extra padding, and other features to ensure that your body is healthy and able to carry what you need. In general, comfort is largely a balance between enough padding and a lighter weight so that the bag doesn’t hinder your ability to move efficiently. When you’re considering the comfort of a given bug out bag, you’ll also want to pay extra attention to how the pack’s hip belt is constructed.
Flashlights, glow sticks, etc. help you to see in dark spaces and provide light to get you around safely. Don’t just rely on battery-operated flashlights because there is a whole world of solar power lighting options available to you now that are much better than they used to be. Light sticks are great for an emergency situation. For example, glow sticks are excellent items in which you reserve their energy until you need to use them. Invest in good lights, not the cheapest you can find. There are so many options, but here is what we use:
The Emergency Zone bug out bag is one of the best equipped you’ll find with everything from the expected like drinking water and flashlight to the unexpected like works, a tube tent, toilet paper and even a multi tool. What it’s light on is food but there’s plenty of room in the water resistant bag for 4 or 5 days of food or more. While the shoulder straps on the Emergency Zone backpack could use some more padding the rest of the pack is logistically sound with plenty of external pockets for the included gear plus your own compass, GPS device, tactical flashlight, maps and more.
Non-perishable food. Don’t just get non-perishable food; look for “non-cook” items for your survival pack, as well. You don’t want to have to rely on a stove, fire, or any other cooking mechanism in an emergency situation. If you don’t have to cook, you don’t need cooking supplies, which means you can save space—and more importantly, weight—in your pack.
The most important factor that will determine the right size bug out bag is your torso size. You can measure your torso by having a friend or casual acquaintance measure the distance from the top of your Iliac Crest (hip bones) up to the bony prominence at the base of your neck (the last cervical vertebrae). Knowing the length of your torso will help you choose a bug out bag that fits comfortably.
Design – The best bug out bag is one with plenty of pockets. This allows you to compartmentalize your bug out bag essentials so that you know exactly where everything is and you don’t have to dig through mountains of other stuff to find what you need. Put all your fire and light things together such as tactical flashlight, candles, headlamp, fire starting kit and storm proof matches. Put maps, GPS devices, compass and other navigation related items in their own pocket and so on. The more you can separate things the easier it will be to transcend your difficulties.
I you live an an area that gets cold, use a real back pack and not a bag so that you can carry a real sleeping bag and tent or tarp/mylar. Good luck out in freezing weather with a tube tent or space blanket! I have camped many nights in the snow and I have mostly done it with just a 9×9 mylar , tarp, and backpacking matris and sleeping bag. I think it would not be good at all with just a tube tent/space blanket that is on a lot of BOB lists.
When calamity strikes you’ll still need to eat and if there are no shelters in the vicinity stocked with emergency supplies what are you supposed to do? The answer is the Food Insurance bug out bag that provides you with copious amounts of prepared food sealed in vacuum pouches and ready to be eaten. Every Food Insurance meal has a shelf life of more than a decade and requires only a bit of water to prepare. Everything from lasagna to omelets to rice and beans are here along with the stove to cook them. Add some of your own survival gear like a tactical flashlight, survival knife, emergency blankets and water filter and you’re ready for whatever comes down the pike.
Some additional items that you should look for in a quality bug out bag include a hydration tube and bladder compatibility (although you’ll usually have to buy these separately), hip belt pockets (where you can store items you want quick access to), and at least one large compartment (where you can fit bulkier items like a tarp, sleeping bag, or large clothing).
The Basic 3-Day Emergency Preparedness Kit is approved by the American Red Cross Scientific Advisory Council. The American Red Cross Scientific Advisory Council, a volunteer committee of nationally recognized health care, aquatics, preparedness and educational professionals, helps establish and assure the scientific basis for Red Cross programs, products and public guidance. Council members’ contributions help ensure that the Red Cross is using the latest science, addressing current needs and is preparing for future changes.

A small size generic spray bottle (or two) with a good spray head (that does not leak) and fits on standard size plastic bottle threads can also be handy to direct fluids exactly where you want and reduce usage. Flushing wounds with water or alcohol, squirting metho through a small flame to put fire on something or someone, cleaning stuff you dropped (phone, torch, glasses), flushing eyes, mouth and teeth, ears, nose and other tricky holes, tracking the ration of your water supply one squirt at a time or just misting some water on your face to cool off … if you can spare it 😉
If you have a family, you’ll need a 72-hour emergency kit that caters to everyone. You can purchase the cheapest backpack you can find, as the items inside your 72-hour kit are the most important aspect. First, you’ll need a change of clothing for each family member – including an appropriate top that will keep you warm and clean underwear. In the event that disaster strikes, everyone should have clean and fresh clothing in case.
You use of this website constitutes and manifests your acceptance of our User Agreement, Privacy Policy, Cookie Policy, and awareness of the California Privacy Rights. Pursuant to U.S. Copyright law, as well as other applicable federal and state laws, the content on this website may not be reproduced, distributed, displayed, transmitted, cached, or otherwise used, without the prior, express, and written permission of Athlon Outdoors.
Hurricane Harvey made landfall on August 25, 2017, as a Category 4 storm near Rockport, Texas, bringing catastrophic flooding to the Gulf Coast. OSHA staff in Region 6, on the ground in areas from Texas to Louisiana and in the National Office are working to protect response and recovery workers from a variety of safety and health hazards associated with hurricane and flood cleanup and recovery.
Pack personal hygiene products in your backpack such as a toothbrush, deodorant, feminine hygiene products, and wipes. The most important thing to remember is prescription medications for each family member, if necessary. You’ll need these in everyday life, so you don’t pack them away for a disaster. Instead, keep all medication stored in a survival kit in your home. This means you can quickly grab the survival kit in an emergency situation.
People with guns tend to be lowest form of animal life on the earth, that have no mercy for babies or innocent adults. One person I used to know became a hero by helping kill 100,000 civilians fleeing an invasion of a city. The good thing is his house caught fire and he was heard by neighbours screaming while being roasted alive for his sins; he did not have to go to hell first.
Non-perishable food. Don’t just get non-perishable food; look for “non-cook” items for your survival pack, as well. You don’t want to have to rely on a stove, fire, or any other cooking mechanism in an emergency situation. If you don’t have to cook, you don’t need cooking supplies, which means you can save space—and more importantly, weight—in your pack.
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