Some additional items that you should look for in a quality bug out bag include a hydration tube and bladder compatibility (although you’ll usually have to buy these separately), hip belt pockets (where you can store items you want quick access to), and at least one large compartment (where you can fit bulkier items like a tarp, sleeping bag, or large clothing).
"description": "When an emergency strikes, be prepared at work or home with the Deluxe 3-Day Emergency Preparedness Kit from the American Red Cross. This kit contains the emergency supplies for one person for 3 days. Supplies include a hand crank emergency radio, water container, and a personal hygiene kit and first aid kit, all contained in a durable back pack with multiple pouches and removable organizer, with room to add your own personal survival gear and apparel.Useful for natural disasters such as Hurricanes, Tornadoes, and Earthquakes.

Word that originated in Smithtown East. Used to describe situations in which weird, unusual, extreme, or out of the ordinary things happen. These situations usually occur when you are under the influence of drugs such as marijuana, shrooms, E etc. The word was founded by the 08 class of smithtown east during the "Lost Boy Era." It has since spread through colleges and towns alike.
The Wise Food Company 56 Serving kit is an excellent addition to your bug out bags and home hunker down food supply. It includes 28 breakfast and 28 entry servings. The food packs have a 25 year shelf life. One container has enough servings for 1 adult (2 servings per day) for one month. You can buy multiple kits for your whole family. Just add boiling water and enjoy.
I really like the top quality contents of this bag. For this reason its our #1 Winner. For the most part its the best of the best with the exception of the two flashlights- they could be better quality. The food pouches have a 30 year shelf life and actually taste good. Keep in mind that this bug out bag doesn’t include many hygiene supplies. Its awesome that all this gear fits in one bag. This is a Great bug out bag overall!
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Prepping is kinda associated with people who prep for stupidly over the top unlikely SHTF scenarios were if the world as we know it has gone then yes maybe a lot of electronics will be useless, but not all, the longer you keep your mobile alive the longer you could have access to what is basically an e-reader which could house millions of survival books and associated materials like mechanics, first aid etc etc, I’d rather carry my tiny phone and a few batteries and a small solar charger than the weight of a stack of books, because in reality you’d need much more knowledge to survive than the significant majority of people possess in their heads, knowledge is power.
I have to agree with Steve: I have a bug out bag ready in case the SHTF. That doesn’t mean that there’s going to be a lot of “safe places” to run to. If we get together with like minded people, we can make a long term plan. The only reason for a “three day bag” is if “they” are coming for you specifically and you can go to another sane location. I personally have packed a .22 revolver and 200 rds., carry a .38 Special and pack 100 rds., and shoulder a Saiga .223 carbine with 200 rds. of “penetrators”, FMJ, and some soft point if I need to take a little larger animal. And, another thing, if you pack “pills” in a baggie and happen to get stopped along the way, you can bet on a trip to the station!
Flashlights, glow sticks, etc. help you to see in dark spaces and provide light to get you around safely. Don’t just rely on battery-operated flashlights because there is a whole world of solar power lighting options available to you now that are much better than they used to be. Light sticks are great for an emergency situation. For example, glow sticks are excellent items in which you reserve their energy until you need to use them. Invest in good lights, not the cheapest you can find. There are so many options, but here is what we use:
Regardless of the premise though, these books will be full of action and adventure as the main character navigates the dangers of a country torn by anarchy in an attempt to find his ex-wife and daughter he left behind while fighting the wars in Europe. Here is the cover for the first book: Feral Nation - Infiltration, with the description below. It is available for preorder on Amazon now, and will be released in the Kindle edition and paperback early next month:
Family members can become separated during an emergency. Be prepared by creating a plan for how to reach one another. Establish an out-of-area contact (such as a relative or friend) who can coordinate family members' locations and information should you become separated. Make sure children learn the phone numbers and addresses, and know the emergency plans.
If you’re having to be outside, fire can be a great way to warm you, to cook your food or even be a signal. Keep a couple of different kinds of fire starters in different areas of your pack, safely protected from the elements, so that you can always have a fire. You’ll also have to think about portable cook stoves if you won’t be able to start a full fire in order to cook your food.

I noticed that a reliable light weight firearm was on the list. While many may think it uselss, a good high powered barrel break pellet rifle can do almost as much as a 22 rifle. A hundred dollars will get you one at Walmart that you can switch from .177 caliber to 22 caliber. The rifle breaks down and is easily carried inside of a decent back pack. The weight of the ammo is significantly lighter as well. This can be used to take down most birds, squirls, rabbits, small pigs and even foxes as well as racoons, armadillo’s. And snakes. All sources of protein.
Every bug out bag should be 100% unique. Sure, there are some basic items that every bug out bag should have (food, lighter, water filter, flashlight, etc.), but you should customize your bag based on where you live, what type of disaster is most likely to occur in your area, and how much weight you can carry over a long distance. Many preppers forget about that last point.
A “Bug out bag” (sometimes called a “bail out bag” or “survival bag”) is loosely defined as a backpack-style bag that a person keeps at the ready in case they need to evacuate in a hurry (bug out) due to natural disaster, civil unrest, fire, war or any other similar type of calamity. A bug out bag won’t be much good should a comet the size of Dallas hit the earth but for the type of events listed above it can make the difference between thriving and barely surviving.
Overall this a great kit which includes so many useful items. Since this kit doesn’t come with full meals and only with food bars, we recommend using this kit in conjunction with separate food rations that we list at the end of this report. Luckily theres a lot of extra room in these bags for you to add more stuff. Keep in mind that this kit doesn’t come with a portable stove.
Consider your family’s situation. How many people are in your family? Does anyone in your family need special consideration? Allergies? Medicine? Do you have an infant? All of these things will determine what you want to pack in your 72-hour survival kit. Keep in mind that your pack should be as minimal as possible—the more you pack, the heavier your 72-hour kit will be.
A small size generic spray bottle (or two) with a good spray head (that does not leak) and fits on standard size plastic bottle threads can also be handy to direct fluids exactly where you want and reduce usage. Flushing wounds with water or alcohol, squirting metho through a small flame to put fire on something or someone, cleaning stuff you dropped (phone, torch, glasses), flushing eyes, mouth and teeth, ears, nose and other tricky holes, tracking the ration of your water supply one squirt at a time or just misting some water on your face to cool off … if you can spare it 😉
If you have kids you know getting out the door on time is a challenge on the best of days. In an emergency, it is not going to be pretty. Let’s look at survival in a disaster from the same standpoint of taking a car trip. Loading the car is a pain! Getting everyone and their stuff in the car and on the road is stressful! Now imagine having to do this in 15 minutes or less with only the essentials. You need to be able to get everyone and thing into the car in as few trips as possible.
I am in the process of finishing up the first book in a new survival fiction series that I think readers of this blog and my other novels will relate to. Set in America in the near future, this series of stories will deal with a collapse scenario caused by coordinated terror attacks, riots and widespread civil unrest. Considering the situation that is unfolding in Europe now and potentially spreading, I think this type of SHTF scenario is more likely than the solar EMP collapse I have written about in my previous novels.
According to the Bug Out Bag Academy, the origins of bug out bags can be traced to the bags that many aviators in the military put together before missions. These were first referred to as ‘bail-out bags’ and they held items that would be critical for survival if a plane was shot down or experienced critical engine failure. Many WWII aviators actually carried gold or silver bullions in their bug out bags, as these were (and still largely are) considered the ‘universal currency’.
Non-perishable food. Don’t just get non-perishable food; look for “non-cook” items for your survival pack, as well. You don’t want to have to rely on a stove, fire, or any other cooking mechanism in an emergency situation. If you don’t have to cook, you don’t need cooking supplies, which means you can save space—and more importantly, weight—in your pack.
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