If you are stranded on the way, your car can serve as a shelter. However, a packed shelter can give you peace of mind in case you are no longer with your car or are given rest in an area without your own shelter. A simple tarp + rope can serve as an emergency shelter, or you can tie a small tent to the bottom of your pack, or make a bedroll out of sheets and pillows. We keep a tote of just the camping equipment that can be attached to our backpacks if needed. We live in an area that even in colder weather, we don’t need heavy-duty gear, so please pack according to your environment.
Lightweight at only two ounces and rated up to 10,000 gallons, the Sawyer Products Mini Water Filtration System can go the distance without weighing you down. The Sawyer removes 99.99999% of all bacteria, including Salmonella, E Coli and Cholera, as well as protozoa, including giardia. It also filters out 100% of all plastics. Pros: We like that the Sawyer acts as a middle ground option between the two LifeStraws, with the ability to be used as a straw directly into a water source as well as coming equipped with a 16-ounce reusable squeeze pouch to carry water. The Sawyer also screws on to most disposable plastic water bottles, making this an excellent option for international travel. Cons: Customers note that the flow of the Sawyer is slow and wish that the product was sold with a carrying case for all the parts, including the filter plunger. Image courtesy of Amazon
That’s true, we do. It’s clear that we can’t carry everything to survive for a year or more on our backs and we count on our stash at point B. If it’s not there, we do the best we can, go to a FEMA camp or die. What are our alternatives? I think that most people will go to point B if they see the problem before it arrives (hurricane) but a surprise nuclear attack on Houston (in my case) would necessitate a quick exit along with everyone else still alive. As to ‘bring it’, I certainly would if a. I had an operational vehicle and b. the roads were clear enough to get around minor obstacles – I don’t and won’t have a two ton or half track at my disposal. If not of if my vehicle becomes untenable along the way, I’ll put on my boots and my BOB and do the best I can. As you say, there are many scenarios.
Professional security contractor, Eric Branson, has been plying his trade overseas, fighting the ongoing insurgencies raging across Europe, when he realizes America faces the same fate. Before he can make his way home to south Florida, a powerful hurricane deals the final blow to an infrastructure already ravaged by burning and looting, leaving survivors cut off and on their own. It is here amid the death and destruction that Eric begins his search for those he left behind, and here that his warrior skills will be tested as never before.
Pack personal hygiene products in your backpack such as a toothbrush, deodorant, feminine hygiene products, and wipes. The most important thing to remember is prescription medications for each family member, if necessary. You’ll need these in everyday life, so you don’t pack them away for a disaster. Instead, keep all medication stored in a survival kit in your home. This means you can quickly grab the survival kit in an emergency situation.
I agree less is more. Use two contractor refuse bags sandwiched together with leaves and moss in between the layers will make a good sleeping bag, floats for river crossings.water storage etc. Not so detectable on ir, properly camouflaged. Thermal a whole different story. The Oath Keepers site has instructions for a thermal evasion cloak. With a little bit of tweaking it will make a very warm and snug sleeping bag. So if evasion from thermal is a concern this might be a solution. It can be used as poncho, lean to, and rain fly. For survival needs I carry .22 with subsonic 1000 fps thereabouts and a silencer. The sound signature is that of a click of the firing pin. For motion detection $ 9.99 motion detector from Harbor Freight, they come in white, mask and and paint black avoiding the white detector cover.
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Small enough to fit in the palm of your hand and strong enough to remove 99.999% of waterborne parasites and bacteria, including E. Coli and Salmonella, the LifeStraw Personal Water Filter works for everything from camping to traveling. The LifeStraw Personal Water Filter not only removes waterborne parasites and bacteria, but it also removes microplastics (down to 1 micron) and turbidity (down to 0.2 microns). LifeStraw is put through rigorous testing, with one Personal Water Filter durable enough to provide 1,000 gallons of clean drinking water. Pros: The filter acts as a giant straw, with users able to drink directly from natural water resources like lakes and rivers. We also like that for every LifeStraw product sold, a school child receives clean drinking water for one year. Cons: Because the LifeStraw is a personal water filter, it’s not ideal for using to gather large quantities of water for a group. Some customers noted that the LifeStraw does require quite a bit of suction, which can make users who are hiking at high altitudes dizzy. Image courtesy of Amazon  
I have an idea , I read an article about pepper spray awhile back. In the article they discussed effective use of pepper spray and at end they made a suggestion that stuck with me. They suggested wasp spray instead of pepper spray because wasp spray will shoot up to 25′ or 50′ that gives you distance & distance could be very vital in survival. I am pretty sure a face full of wasp spray will stop someone especially since wasp spray foams. Just an idea plus it would serve two purposes.
I agree with all except this one, “you should carry a water filter instead.” That water filter does NOT filter viruses which can incapacitate or kill just as quickly as can the bacteria it does eliminate. Carry purification tablets & a couple gallon sized double-ziplock baggies or an aluminum/titanium pot (multiple uses) or learn about SODIS instead. Why plan to fail?
I think this list is good too for a person that would not be able to get home but would need to wait where they are until a family member could get to them. For instance I know someone who would have to go thru the middle of a city to get home and I know she would get lost trying to go around the town. Someone would need to go get her at her work place.
I used to have bug out bag but not anymore because we are living in the end times, the rapture and the 7 year Tribulation are right around the corner. Get rapture ready, people: accept JESUS CHRIST as your personal Lord and Savior who paid on the cross for our sins and came back to life on the 3rd day!!! We have to come to the cross as broken sinners.
Water for washing, drinking and cooking. Canada recommends 2 litres (0.53 US gal) per person per day for drinking and an additional 2 litres (0.53 US gal) per person per day for cleaning and hygiene if possible.[18] New Zealand recommends 3 litres (0.79 US gal) per person per day for drinking.[19] The US recommends 1 US gallon (3.8 L) per person per day.[20]
Viral pathogens most often found in water are typically Hepatitis A, Norwalk and Rotovirus, all of which are smaller than most filters are incapable of trapping. They’re species specific which means human to human transmission, and all 3 are associated most often with fecal contamination, thus the further you get from population centers, the lower the risk becomes. For viral coverage, water purification is needed to kill the virus. Chlorine base chemicals are the best treatment next to boiling. UV pens and filter add-ons work good, but are not as effective as heat/chemical treatment. If you know the area you’re heading to, has a previous reputation of human traffic (like campgrounds), then avoid the UV treatment. If the area you’re in is not a high traffic area, UV is alright for use, but personally, I’d rather heat or chemically treat to be sure, and just bypass the expense and extra weight of a UV purifier.
As important as the size of the pack you choose is the comfort of the pack. Many of the packs that we reviewed have compression straps, extra padding, and other features to ensure that your body is healthy and able to carry what you need. In general, comfort is largely a balance between enough padding and a lighter weight so that the bag doesn’t hinder your ability to move efficiently. When you’re considering the comfort of a given bug out bag, you’ll also want to pay extra attention to how the pack’s hip belt is constructed.
The term "bug-out bag" is related to, and possibly derived from, the "bail-out bag" emergency kit many military aviators carry. In the United States, the term refers to the Korean War practice of the U.S. Army designating alternative defensive positions, in the event that the units had to retreat. They were directed to "bug out" when being overrun was imminent. The term has since been adopted by military training institutions around the world, with Standard Operating Procedures involving a bug out location, a method of withdrawal, and the bare supplies needed to withdraw quickly but still survive in the field.[11] The concept passed into wide usage among other military and law enforcement personnel, though the "bail-out bag" is as likely to include emergency gear for going into an emergency situation as for escaping an emergency.[12]
The Emergency Zone bug out bag is one of the best equipped you’ll find with everything from the expected like drinking water and flashlight to the unexpected like works, a tube tent, toilet paper and even a multi tool. What it’s light on is food but there’s plenty of room in the water resistant bag for 4 or 5 days of food or more. While the shoulder straps on the Emergency Zone backpack could use some more padding the rest of the pack is logistically sound with plenty of external pockets for the included gear plus your own compass, GPS device, tactical flashlight, maps and more.
The whole point of a bug out bag is that it is ALWAYS packed and ready to go. In a true emergency, you might not have the time to throw those last few items into your bug out bag that you’ll really need. So, the short answer to this question is that the bag should be packed and ready to go at all times. But you should also be careful to regularly check any items in your bag that could expire or need replacement if they’ve been sitting for a while.
I really like the top quality contents of this bag. For this reason its our #1 Winner. For the most part its the best of the best with the exception of the two flashlights- they could be better quality. The food pouches have a 30 year shelf life and actually taste good. Keep in mind that this bug out bag doesn’t include many hygiene supplies. Its awesome that all this gear fits in one bag. This is a Great bug out bag overall!
For someone new to being a Survivalist building your first Bug Out Bag can seem like a big task. Everybody you read about has been tweaking theirs for months or even years and has a pile of gear built up. It’s hard to know where to start, but if you cover all of the basics in a survival situation you will still be much better off that 99% of the people.
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