There are many types of disasters and emergencies: floods, fires, earthquakes,hurricanes and tornadoes. in many cases, a 72 hour kit could mean the difference between life and death. It is estimated that after a major disaster, it may take up to three days for relief workers to reach some areas. It would be wise to consider a 72 hour kit that you could live on for 7-10 days. In such a case, If you live in a disaster prone area a 72-hour kit is the minimum you should have available. Plan your 72 hour kit according to your familys’ size.
Some survivalists also recommend keeping a get me home kit in the car and/or at work. This is a kit to enable a person to get back home from work in an emergency where all transport cars and public transport have broken down. It is designed around personal circumstances where, for example, a walk of 25 kilometres might be required from work to home. The get me home kit can include, for example, enough water to get home, suitable walking shoes, a map (not electronic), enough food for 12 hours, clothing for adverse weather, etc.
Wenn man sich jetzt anschaut, dass ca. 31 Tausend Polizisten im Einsatz waren um für die Sicherheit während dieses Gipfels zu sorgen, auf der anderen Seite aber nur ca. 500-800 Randalierer unterwegs waren, die stellenweise ganze Straßenzüge zerstört haben und eine ganze Stadt in den Ausnahmezustand gebracht haben, dann fragt man sich schon, wie die Ordnungkräfte ein noch viel größeres Ereignis mit vielleicht Zehntausenden solcher gewalltbereiten Randalierer unter Kontrolle bringen möchte.

But how do you pack effectively and what exactly should you be packing? In this 72-hour kit checklist, we explore questions you should consider prior to packing and break down your pack into things you need, things you’ll want, and what’s nice to have in an emergency situation. You can also take a look at premade 72-hour kits you can buy here and then consider what you want to add to them.
On another note, the only thing I had trouble with was #1. Yes, sleeping bags are big and fat and are a pain to carry, but they will make up for it in heat. You need that heat, at least here in the Pacific Northwest where I live. You use a space blanket or bivvy, you get either a miserable night (lucky), or hypothermia (normal). I wouldn’t mind packing a bivvy instead if I lived in a warmer climate, but seriously, don’t skimp on the sleeping bag.
Katie is a Colorado-native, BYU graduated, and most importantly, wife to one and mother to three beautiful boys. She is passionate about sharing her experiences with others - especially about pregnancy, breastfeeding, cooking, and crafts. She is currently training to be a Certified Lactation Educator. She loves spending time with her family and helping others find joy in family life. Read more...

If I could ask a stupid question… I’m planning on immigrating from the US to the UK where some laws are different for preppers. Things that I have here, such as my machete and combat/survival knives are illegal there. As are most firearms without extensive registering and licensing and I’m sure those few with real firearms are on a list there. And likely new immigrants are prohibited from owning firearms and most weapons in general. I also have a future wife and two children there to consider. I’m ex military and martial artist but they aren’t and I want them to be able to get prepared asap. Any suggestions? Thank you immensely for this information and for educating beginner preppers. Contrary to some posts here, many of these items, while perhaps not necessary, can make the difference between life and death or worse the deaths of loved ones. Vaseline, duct and electricical tape, socks, gloves, cotton, fishing gear, strong paracord, and much more have a wide myriad of uses. Also I would suggest getting at least basic military field medical training to treat cuts, infections, GSWs (gunshot wounds), etc. One strong suggestion, I personally would add various sized plastic Ziploc type bags and at least a couple of contractor trash bags. These are indispensable. They can help with distilling water with a solar still in even a post nuke environment, with Vaseline can patch a sucking chest wound, can keep your documents, phone and other paper or electronic equipment dry, etc… In addition, know your surroundings, what’s available, and LEARN TO IMPROVISE. Learn to make a firebow, what wood types in your environment are best, how to make your own fishhooks or fishing spear from wood or bone or scrap metal, etc. A small saw is indispensable. I also have a leatherman tool and a couple of different sized pliers as well as wire cutters and a small coil of wire…which also has a myriad of uses from securing any blade to a handle or shaft to making fish hooks, to even crafting various boobytraps and snares. Be vigilant, know your surroundings and common things and locations you see daily. Make mental note. Learn to braid paracord. Or martial arts. Your most valuable resources you can ever have are your mind and body, keep them honed and healthy and continue to learn and perfect your craft. One last note: nearly anything is possible with the right knowledge. Best wishes to all reading this. ♡


Flashlights, glow sticks, etc. help you to see in dark spaces and provide light to get you around safely. Don’t just rely on battery-operated flashlights because there is a whole world of solar power lighting options available to you now that are much better than they used to be. Light sticks are great for an emergency situation. For example, glow sticks are excellent items in which you reserve their energy until you need to use them. Invest in good lights, not the cheapest you can find. There are so many options, but here is what we use:
When it comes to emergency food, many companies play fast and loose with the facts. They create products that don't contain near enough of the nutrients you need in a survival situation —things like calories and protein—and then represent those products as "top quality.” To help consumers identify emergency food that contains everything they need to remain active during a disaster and survive, BePrepared.com created the industry's first Quality Survival Standards (QSS). The QSS is defined by these two core nutritional and survival standards: 1,800 calories per person per day and 40g of protein per person per day.
After decades of experience as a local pest control company, we understand the challenges that homeowners in the southeast face. We know how these pests can impact your lives, cause health and structural hazards, and most importantly, how to get rid of them. We take education seriously; so much so that our full-time, in-house training team acts as an ongoing resource to stay up to date on pest control techniques, behaviors, and adaptations. As a company, many of our team members have been with us for over ten years – something unheard of in the competitive pest control landscape. This means that our technicians are extremely familiar with local pests, as well as our environmentally friendly way of doing things.
×