"description": "This Starter kit provides the basic essentials for one person's food and water for 12 hours and beyond in light, communication, protection, first aid, and personal comfort items. These essential supplies are packaged in a convenient handled bag with two removable pouches containing First Aid Kit and Personal Comfort items. Useful for natural disasters such as Hurricanes, Tornadoes, and Earthquakes.
A small size generic spray bottle (or two) with a good spray head (that does not leak) and fits on standard size plastic bottle threads can also be handy to direct fluids exactly where you want and reduce usage. Flushing wounds with water or alcohol, squirting metho through a small flame to put fire on something or someone, cleaning stuff you dropped (phone, torch, glasses), flushing eyes, mouth and teeth, ears, nose and other tricky holes, tracking the ration of your water supply one squirt at a time or just misting some water on your face to cool off … if you can spare it 😉

There’s no denying the that first aid kit, paracord, emergency tent, waterproof poncho, compass, tactical gloves, candles and more will all come in handy should you find yourself forced to flee with no shelter in sight. The tomahawk will also save you the need to try and harvest wood for a fire using a survival knife and the machete, beyond its obvious self-defense cred, may come in handy if you decide to hack some underbrush to make a cover for your shelter. Where this bug out bag drops the ball a bit is in having virtually no purified water (although to be fair it does include a water filter) and only a single package of emergency rations. Nonetheless if you find yourself wandering the wild due to natural disaster this bug out bag when augmented with food and water, will stand you in good stead.

As important as the size of the pack you choose is the comfort of the pack. Many of the packs that we reviewed have compression straps, extra padding, and other features to ensure that your body is healthy and able to carry what you need. In general, comfort is largely a balance between enough padding and a lighter weight so that the bag doesn’t hinder your ability to move efficiently. When you’re considering the comfort of a given bug out bag, you’ll also want to pay extra attention to how the pack’s hip belt is constructed.


I think you’re both correct, although you are addressing separate threat levels and emergencies (civil disobedience vs. natural disaster). I keep a basic bag, plus a small box with optionals that can be quickly loaded, depending on the threat. I realize this may take precious seconds, so this is time dependent. I live in the Chicago area, so civil unrest is a greater concern, and my firearms choice reflects this probable eventuality.

If you have kids you know getting out the door on time is a challenge on the best of days. In an emergency, it is not going to be pretty. Let’s look at survival in a disaster from the same standpoint of taking a car trip. Loading the car is a pain! Getting everyone and their stuff in the car and on the road is stressful! Now imagine having to do this in 15 minutes or less with only the essentials. You need to be able to get everyone and thing into the car in as few trips as possible.
"description": "This Starter kit provides the basic essentials for one person's food and water for 12 hours and beyond in light, communication, protection, first aid, and personal comfort items. These essential supplies are packaged in a convenient handled bag with two removable pouches containing First Aid Kit and Personal Comfort items. Useful for natural disasters such as Hurricanes, Tornadoes, and Earthquakes.

Steel four in one tool which features a shovel, saw, pick, and bottle opener. 11 in 1 credit card survival tool. Machete, wire saw, camping tube tent, camouflage bag, compass, 8 inch blade, magnesium alloy fire starter, axe, 18 fortified food bars, first aid kit, 12 pouches of drinking water, military style poncho with hood and pull cord which features grommets that can be used to anchor it for rain protection or as tent as well as other purposes like as a wind shelter. US Army Survival Field Manual. Glow sticks, whistle, polar shield blanket. Three in one belt buckle (whistle, flint fire starter), weatherproof matches, ceramic knife sharpener. Lifestraw (advanced chemical free water filter which can filter up to 1000 litres of water).


In the near future, a nation is in peril as anarchy spreads in the wake of coordinated attacks by foreign and domestic terrorists. The growing civil unrest and insurrection in the aftermath forces those in power to enact harsh countermeasures in an effort to maintain order and security. Battles between dissident factions rage in the streets from coast-to-coast as many cities and towns become war zones. Travel and communications are severely restricted, food and fuel supplies disappear, and the economy teeters on the brink of collapse...

How to Make a Bug Out Bag? – If you decide to make your own bug out bag you’ll want to start with a good-sized, water-resistant backpack and then fill it with a combination of food and practical implements that will allow you to transcend any difficulties you’re likely to encounter. You’ll want to include purified water as well as a water filter (in case the emergency has fouled the local water supply), plenty of freeze dried food along with power bars (but no perishables) and things you can use to protect yourself from the wind, cold and any precipitation that may be falling. Which means you’ll want emergency blankets, dry clothes and rain ponchos. You’ll also want to include other practical implements like a compass, tactical flashlight, walkie talkies, multi tool and more.


When it comes to emergency food, many companies play fast and loose with the facts. They create products that don't contain near enough of the nutrients you need in a survival situation —things like calories and protein—and then represent those products as "top quality.” To help consumers identify emergency food that contains everything they need to remain active during a disaster and survive, BePrepared.com created the industry's first Quality Survival Standards (QSS). The QSS is defined by these two core nutritional and survival standards: 1,800 calories per person per day and 40g of protein per person per day.
Good list! I have/use my daughter’s old diaper bag for compartmentalized carry. It is the bigger “gym bag” type with adjustable shoulder strap with multiple compartments. Best part is it comes ready for “messes” so each compartment is also waterproofed to keep liquids from going to other areas. Also, was made with carrying stuff around in mind so the strap has a big cushion that fits comfortably on my shoulder when using.
How to Make a Bug Out Bag? – If you decide to make your own bug out bag you’ll want to start with a good-sized, water-resistant backpack and then fill it with a combination of food and practical implements that will allow you to transcend any difficulties you’re likely to encounter. You’ll want to include purified water as well as a water filter (in case the emergency has fouled the local water supply), plenty of freeze dried food along with power bars (but no perishables) and things you can use to protect yourself from the wind, cold and any precipitation that may be falling. Which means you’ll want emergency blankets, dry clothes and rain ponchos. You’ll also want to include other practical implements like a compass, tactical flashlight, walkie talkies, multi tool and more.
useful vs bugs, but it also protects vs condensation inside of the Escape bivvy. If I get inside all of the bags, I can sleep pk (by virtue of an Ambien pill) at freezing temps, given two sets of long johns, wearing my (unlaced boots or 2 sets of socks) gloves, shemaugh around the face, (keep head inside the bags) neck gaiter, boonie hat,, and balaclava. This is if I”m up in a hammock or on a pile of dry debris. If I add dry debris between all the bags and the layers of clothing, I can sleep ok at 20F, and suffer thru the night at `10F, or sleep ok with a seated position and the UCO candle lantern (beeswax candles only) or happy rocks/water bottles giving off heat between my feet. I can handle 0F if I can have the aluminum foil reflector on the far side of a Dakota fire pit, using the happy rocks, and the PEVA over the propped open end of the bivvy. If it’s below zero, it’s unlikely (at night, at least) that anyone will bother you if you use a Siberian fire lay to “project” heat 6 ft or so, “aimed” at the propped open head end of the bivvy. The clear PEVA lets in radiant heat, but then traps it. If you set up the gear as a supershelter, 0F at night can become 40F by noon, if the sun comes out, due to the greenhouse effect.
The whole point of a bug out bag is that it is ALWAYS packed and ready to go. In a true emergency, you might not have the time to throw those last few items into your bug out bag that you’ll really need. So, the short answer to this question is that the bag should be packed and ready to go at all times. But you should also be careful to regularly check any items in your bag that could expire or need replacement if they’ve been sitting for a while.
I have an idea , I read an article about pepper spray awhile back. In the article they discussed effective use of pepper spray and at end they made a suggestion that stuck with me. They suggested wasp spray instead of pepper spray because wasp spray will shoot up to 25′ or 50′ that gives you distance & distance could be very vital in survival. I am pretty sure a face full of wasp spray will stop someone especially since wasp spray foams. Just an idea plus it would serve two purposes.
The whole point of a bug out bag is that it is ALWAYS packed and ready to go. In a true emergency, you might not have the time to throw those last few items into your bug out bag that you’ll really need. So, the short answer to this question is that the bag should be packed and ready to go at all times. But you should also be careful to regularly check any items in your bag that could expire or need replacement if they’ve been sitting for a while.
There are many types of disasters and emergencies: floods, fires, earthquakes,hurricanes and tornadoes. in many cases, a 72 hour kit could mean the difference between life and death. It is estimated that after a major disaster, it may take up to three days for relief workers to reach some areas. It would be wise to consider a 72 hour kit that you could live on for 7-10 days. In such a case, If you live in a disaster prone area a 72-hour kit is the minimum you should have available. Plan your 72 hour kit according to your familys’ size.
Disclaimer: This website and the material covered is for informational purposes only. We take no responsibility for what you do with this knowledge. By taking and/or using any informational resources from this website you agree that you will use this information in a safe and legal manner, consistent with all applicable laws, safety rules, and good common sense. Full disclaimers here.

There’s always going to be the debate of Bugging In v. Bugging Out, and that is really our job as readers and posters to decide which is best for us and determine the situations/scenarios we may be faced with. What degree of societal collapse do we need to see, before we get the heck out of town? Obviously, the more rural your location is, the higher the probability of staying in place will be. One’s health, general level of physical conditioning and age are all factors we need to consider. It’s easy to say “Get into shape,” but the reality is that may not be possible for some of us with long standing health problems. For those of us incapable of increasing our strength or endurance, Bugging Out may be our last option.

Tent: In many emergency situations, shelter may be hard to find. While packing a traditional tent may not be a viable option, a good bug out bag should always include a waterproof survival tent. The best survival tents are made of Mylar, which can retain heat and repel water. Pro-tip: Be sure to stack leaves, grass or anything else from around the campsite against the tent for added protection from the elements.
If I could ask a stupid question… I’m planning on immigrating from the US to the UK where some laws are different for preppers. Things that I have here, such as my machete and combat/survival knives are illegal there. As are most firearms without extensive registering and licensing and I’m sure those few with real firearms are on a list there. And likely new immigrants are prohibited from owning firearms and most weapons in general. I also have a future wife and two children there to consider. I’m ex military and martial artist but they aren’t and I want them to be able to get prepared asap. Any suggestions? Thank you immensely for this information and for educating beginner preppers. Contrary to some posts here, many of these items, while perhaps not necessary, can make the difference between life and death or worse the deaths of loved ones. Vaseline, duct and electricical tape, socks, gloves, cotton, fishing gear, strong paracord, and much more have a wide myriad of uses. Also I would suggest getting at least basic military field medical training to treat cuts, infections, GSWs (gunshot wounds), etc. One strong suggestion, I personally would add various sized plastic Ziploc type bags and at least a couple of contractor trash bags. These are indispensable. They can help with distilling water with a solar still in even a post nuke environment, with Vaseline can patch a sucking chest wound, can keep your documents, phone and other paper or electronic equipment dry, etc… In addition, know your surroundings, what’s available, and LEARN TO IMPROVISE. Learn to make a firebow, what wood types in your environment are best, how to make your own fishhooks or fishing spear from wood or bone or scrap metal, etc. A small saw is indispensable. I also have a leatherman tool and a couple of different sized pliers as well as wire cutters and a small coil of wire…which also has a myriad of uses from securing any blade to a handle or shaft to making fish hooks, to even crafting various boobytraps and snares. Be vigilant, know your surroundings and common things and locations you see daily. Make mental note. Learn to braid paracord. Or martial arts. Your most valuable resources you can ever have are your mind and body, keep them honed and healthy and continue to learn and perfect your craft. One last note: nearly anything is possible with the right knowledge. Best wishes to all reading this. ♡

Look for a pack that has multiple compartments, with pockets and organizers built in to help keep track of the small items, and try to pack your BOB strategically with items grouped that you’ll use together. Remember to pack clothes and bulky items on the bottom and heavier items at the top for better weight distribution and to ease the strain on your body.  
The bottom line is: unfortunate things happen all the time and you are the first and best defense for helping yourself and your family. "Do not put off the improbable for the unthinkable... If there is a one in a million chance of something happening to you then it is happening to 300 people in this country right now:' Richard Gist, Kansas City Fire Department For getting disaster-ready: First, you need an emergency preparedness plan. Here's an easy Emergency Evacuation Plan template you can use—just fill in your information and you're ready to go! After your plan is in place, you'll need:
The bottom line is: unfortunate things happen all the time and you are the first and best defense for helping yourself and your family. "Do not put off the improbable for the unthinkable... If there is a one in a million chance of something happening to you then it is happening to 300 people in this country right now:' Richard Gist, Kansas City Fire Department For getting disaster-ready: First, you need an emergency preparedness plan. Here's an easy Emergency Evacuation Plan template you can use—just fill in your information and you're ready to go! After your plan is in place, you'll need:
I have an idea , I read an article about pepper spray awhile back. In the article they discussed effective use of pepper spray and at end they made a suggestion that stuck with me. They suggested wasp spray instead of pepper spray because wasp spray will shoot up to 25′ or 50′ that gives you distance & distance could be very vital in survival. I am pretty sure a face full of wasp spray will stop someone especially since wasp spray foams. Just an idea plus it would serve two purposes.

"description": "When an emergency strikes, be prepared at work or home with the Deluxe 3-Day Emergency Preparedness Kit from the American Red Cross. This kit contains the emergency supplies for one person for 3 days. Supplies include a hand crank emergency radio, water container, and a personal hygiene kit and first aid kit, all contained in a durable back pack with multiple pouches and removable organizer, with room to add your own personal survival gear and apparel.Useful for natural disasters such as Hurricanes, Tornadoes, and Earthquakes.


The whole point of a bug out bag is that it is ALWAYS packed and ready to go. In a true emergency, you might not have the time to throw those last few items into your bug out bag that you’ll really need. So, the short answer to this question is that the bag should be packed and ready to go at all times. But you should also be careful to regularly check any items in your bag that could expire or need replacement if they’ve been sitting for a while.
I agree with all except this one, “you should carry a water filter instead.” That water filter does NOT filter viruses which can incapacitate or kill just as quickly as can the bacteria it does eliminate. Carry purification tablets & a couple gallon sized double-ziplock baggies or an aluminum/titanium pot (multiple uses) or learn about SODIS instead. Why plan to fail?
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