I noticed that a reliable light weight firearm was on the list. While many may think it uselss, a good high powered barrel break pellet rifle can do almost as much as a 22 rifle. A hundred dollars will get you one at Walmart that you can switch from .177 caliber to 22 caliber. The rifle breaks down and is easily carried inside of a decent back pack. The weight of the ammo is significantly lighter as well. This can be used to take down most birds, squirls, rabbits, small pigs and even foxes as well as racoons, armadillo’s. And snakes. All sources of protein.
The second book picks right up where Book One left off, with Eric Branson and his new sidekick, Jonathan, getting ready to set sail from south Florida to cross the Gulf of Mexico to Louisiana, where Eric's brother is a deputy sheriff in a rural parish bordering the Atchafalaya River. This second installment of the series gets into a little more of the overall situation in the country, which is a state of chaos due to anarchist riots and terror attacks. Unlike my Pulse and Darkness After series, the problems that arise in this series are human-caused, and not too far removed from reality considering some of the recent happenings in that have been in the news.

Look for a pack that has multiple compartments, with pockets and organizers built in to help keep track of the small items, and try to pack your BOB strategically with items grouped that you’ll use together. Remember to pack clothes and bulky items on the bottom and heavier items at the top for better weight distribution and to ease the strain on your body.  


There’s always going to be the debate of Bugging In v. Bugging Out, and that is really our job as readers and posters to decide which is best for us and determine the situations/scenarios we may be faced with. What degree of societal collapse do we need to see, before we get the heck out of town? Obviously, the more rural your location is, the higher the probability of staying in place will be. One’s health, general level of physical conditioning and age are all factors we need to consider. It’s easy to say “Get into shape,” but the reality is that may not be possible for some of us with long standing health problems. For those of us incapable of increasing our strength or endurance, Bugging Out may be our last option.

I have to agree with Steve: I have a bug out bag ready in case the SHTF. That doesn’t mean that there’s going to be a lot of “safe places” to run to. If we get together with like minded people, we can make a long term plan. The only reason for a “three day bag” is if “they” are coming for you specifically and you can go to another sane location. I personally have packed a .22 revolver and 200 rds., carry a .38 Special and pack 100 rds., and shoulder a Saiga .223 carbine with 200 rds. of “penetrators”, FMJ, and some soft point if I need to take a little larger animal. And, another thing, if you pack “pills” in a baggie and happen to get stopped along the way, you can bet on a trip to the station!
What to Put in a Bug Out Bag? – If your pre-made bug out bag focuses on tactical and survival gear you’ll need to finish it by purchasing dehydrated meals and other foodstuffs with long shelf lives. If the bag focuses on food you’ll need to supply survival gear such as a flashlight or two, emergency blankets, first aid kit, paracord, EDC knife and other things. If you’re making your own bug out bag read the answer to the next question.

Lightweight at only two ounces and rated up to 10,000 gallons, the Sawyer Products Mini Water Filtration System can go the distance without weighing you down. The Sawyer removes 99.99999% of all bacteria, including Salmonella, E Coli and Cholera, as well as protozoa, including giardia. It also filters out 100% of all plastics. Pros: We like that the Sawyer acts as a middle ground option between the two LifeStraws, with the ability to be used as a straw directly into a water source as well as coming equipped with a 16-ounce reusable squeeze pouch to carry water. The Sawyer also screws on to most disposable plastic water bottles, making this an excellent option for international travel. Cons: Customers note that the flow of the Sawyer is slow and wish that the product was sold with a carrying case for all the parts, including the filter plunger. Image courtesy of Amazon
"description": "The Basic 3-Day Emergency Preparedness Kit prepares you for natural disasters such as Tornadoes, Hurricanes, and Earthquakes. It contains the basic supplies for one person for 3 days, including emergency food, water and a water container sufficient to hold a 3 day supply of water. This kit also contains a crank-powered flashlight/radio/cell phone charger, a multi-tool and survival supplies all in a lightweight backpack with extra room for personal items.
The whole point of a bug out bag is that it is ALWAYS packed and ready to go. In a true emergency, you might not have the time to throw those last few items into your bug out bag that you’ll really need. So, the short answer to this question is that the bag should be packed and ready to go at all times. But you should also be careful to regularly check any items in your bag that could expire or need replacement if they’ve been sitting for a while.
Family members can become separated during an emergency. Be prepared by creating a plan for how to reach one another. Establish an out-of-area contact (such as a relative or friend) who can coordinate family members' locations and information should you become separated. Make sure children learn the phone numbers and addresses, and know the emergency plans.
The Basic 3-Day Emergency Preparedness Kit is approved by the American Red Cross Scientific Advisory Council. The American Red Cross Scientific Advisory Council, a volunteer committee of nationally recognized health care, aquatics, preparedness and educational professionals, helps establish and assure the scientific basis for Red Cross programs, products and public guidance. Council members’ contributions help ensure that the Red Cross is using the latest science, addressing current needs and is preparing for future changes.

What is a 72-hour kit? It is a kit (sometimes referred to as a Go Bag) in a backpack or tote that allows you to live away from your home for up to 3-4 days in an emergency. It is different from a Bug Out Bag (BOB) as a B.O.B. is meant for the possibility of permanently living away from home. Your 72-hour kit is intended to allow you to escape an immediate threat, live for 3 (or 4 if you stretch it) days without relying on authorities or going back home (though sometimes, home won’t be an option if it is bad enough and that BOB will be a blessing).
Lightweight at only two ounces and rated up to 10,000 gallons, the Sawyer Products Mini Water Filtration System can go the distance without weighing you down. The Sawyer removes 99.99999% of all bacteria, including Salmonella, E Coli and Cholera, as well as protozoa, including giardia. It also filters out 100% of all plastics. Pros: We like that the Sawyer acts as a middle ground option between the two LifeStraws, with the ability to be used as a straw directly into a water source as well as coming equipped with a 16-ounce reusable squeeze pouch to carry water. The Sawyer also screws on to most disposable plastic water bottles, making this an excellent option for international travel. Cons: Customers note that the flow of the Sawyer is slow and wish that the product was sold with a carrying case for all the parts, including the filter plunger. Image courtesy of Amazon

Space can be limited, and so it's easy to not think about getting your Grab-n-go supplies ready. The average 72-hour-kit only takes up a little space and is well worth it. You are more likely to run into a situation that needs a 72-hr-kit for a short term emergency than just about anything else. So you have food and water, but do you have everything you would need to survive in case the local stores are all closed and you need a shelter in place? There are many things we use each day that we might take for granted such as tooth paste, or deodorant.


Yes, this is something that often goes overlooked. I wouldn’t COUNT on everyone being there for a bug out situation, as by nature you never know where everyone might be at the moment and if they will all be there with you, but spreading the weight across several people can make a huge difference. Suddenly an unfathomable 50 pound carry load becomes more than reasonable with a family of 5.
Water for washing, drinking and cooking. Canada recommends 2 litres (0.53 US gal) per person per day for drinking and an additional 2 litres (0.53 US gal) per person per day for cleaning and hygiene if possible.[18] New Zealand recommends 3 litres (0.79 US gal) per person per day for drinking.[19] The US recommends 1 US gallon (3.8 L) per person per day.[20]

When loaded and put on properly, your hips should carry the bulk of your pack’s weight. Because of this, extra padding in the hip belt can make a lot of difference. However, you should also make sure the hip belt isn’t so bulky that it ends up rubbing your hip bones or ribs uncomfortably. In an ideal world, your bug out bag’s hip belt should fit comfortably between the top of your hip bones and the bottom of your lowest ribs. 
Scenario #2: Wildfires happening in the Northwest and California had people evacuating their homes, sometimes with only minutes to spare, and having no place to go until they could find shelter with friends or family or in government shelters, depending on what was available (this is a real-life situation in California and the Northwest almost every year).
attitude (7) bicycles (3) BLM land (1) BOB (1) BOL (4) BOL Overview (3) book review (10) BOS (2) BOV (12) bow and arrow (1) bug out survival (6) bug-out bags (5) bug-out boats (12) Bug-Out Glossary (5) bug-out locations (11) bug-out regions (3) bug-out vehicles (14) bugging out (20) camp cooking (3) camping equipment (4) canoes (3) communications (1) desert (4) diasters (6) electronics (2) emergency equipment (7) evasion and escape (3) fire (3) first aid (4) first post (1) fishing (3) fitnesss (3) food (1) gathering (2) gear review (9) Gulf oil spill (5) guns (16) hunting (6) hurricanes (2) interviews (17) jungle (5) knives (8) motorcycles (7) mountains (4) natural medicene (3) navigation (2) online resources (10) pistols (6) planning (9) post-apocolyptic (5) prepping (9) revolvers (2) rifles (10) rivers (3) sea kayaks (4) seashore (10) SHTF (14) skills (5) survival in general (16) swamps (5) TEOTWAWKI (5) the bug out book (16) Today's BOV (2) Today's Bug-Out Photo (1) Today's Gun (6) Today's Video (5) tools (8) transportation (6) urban survival (11) video (5) walking out (2) water (6) water travel (3) weapons (16) weather (2) Wild Edibles (1) wilderness (3) wilderness living (9) wilderness survival (7) wilderness travel (19) woods (3)
A survival kit is one of those items that you carry in your pack in case you need it, but hope you never have to open it, and if you find yourself in a situation where you have to open it, you better make dang sure it includes what you'll need. To help, here are a few considerations you'll want to take into account as you prepare your own emergency, survival, bug-out-bag, as well as some packages that have some of the vital components already included.
The primary purpose of a bug-out bag is to allow one to evacuate quickly if a disaster should strike.[13] It is therefore prudent to gather into a single place all of the materials and supplies that might be required to do this, such as a bag or a few storage containers. The recommendation that a bug-out bag contain enough supplies for 72 hours arises from advice from organizations responsible for disaster relief and management that it may take them up to 72 hours to reach people affected by a disaster and offer help.[14] The bag's contents may vary according to the region of the user, as someone evacuating from the path of a hurricane may have different supplies from someone who lives in an area prone to blizzards, earthquakes, or wildfires.
The unfortunate reality of our world today is that we’re never quite sure when our comfortable existences will be dramatically disrupted. We can, however, prepare so that we are as ready as possible if that does happen. In this section, we’re going to offer answers to some of the most commonly asked questions about bug out bags so that you can further gather knowledge that will help you make your selection.
Picture this: A local emergency of some sort has emergency personnel knocking on your door telling you that you have 5 minutes to evacuate your house (fire, gas leak, railroad collision, earthquake). What will you grab in those 5 minutes? Hopefully, you’ll get your children and your 72-hour kit (and then whatever else you think you have time to grab and can carry).
For someone new to being a Survivalist building your first Bug Out Bag can seem like a big task. Everybody you read about has been tweaking theirs for months or even years and has a pile of gear built up. It’s hard to know where to start, but if you cover all of the basics in a survival situation you will still be much better off that 99% of the people.
×