The term go-kit is popular in the amateur radio service, especially in the Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES) and Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Service (RACES) communities, and describes a combination personal bug-out bag and portable amateur radio station. A personal go-kit generally takes some combination of units: a "one-day" (or "24 hour") kit, a "three day" (or "72 hour") kit that adds additional supplies, or a "one week kit" that adds yet additional personal items to the three-day kit. Any or all supports deploying the operator plus his or her privately owned self-contained radio communications setup.
The Emergency Zone bug out bag is one of the best equipped you’ll find with everything from the expected like drinking water and flashlight to the unexpected like works, a tube tent, toilet paper and even a multi tool. What it’s light on is food but there’s plenty of room in the water resistant bag for 4 or 5 days of food or more. While the shoulder straps on the Emergency Zone backpack could use some more padding the rest of the pack is logistically sound with plenty of external pockets for the included gear plus your own compass, GPS device, tactical flashlight, maps and more.
That’s true, we do. It’s clear that we can’t carry everything to survive for a year or more on our backs and we count on our stash at point B. If it’s not there, we do the best we can, go to a FEMA camp or die. What are our alternatives? I think that most people will go to point B if they see the problem before it arrives (hurricane) but a surprise nuclear attack on Houston (in my case) would necessitate a quick exit along with everyone else still alive. As to ‘bring it’, I certainly would if a. I had an operational vehicle and b. the roads were clear enough to get around minor obstacles – I don’t and won’t have a two ton or half track at my disposal. If not of if my vehicle becomes untenable along the way, I’ll put on my boots and my BOB and do the best I can. As you say, there are many scenarios.
No one likes thinking about natural disasters or other emergencies that might put your family at risk, but ignoring the possibility won’t keep you and your loved ones safe. Being prepared is the best way to ensure that your family is as safe as possible no matter what might happen. If you live in an area that’s prone to earthquakes, an earthquake kit is an invaluable to have on hand. A good kit should contain everything a family needs to survive for a few days, in case help can’t get to you right away after a disaster. You can build your own earthquake preparation kit, but purchasing a pre-made version is often easier, cheaper, and safer than assembling the pieces yourself. But that’s only if you choose the right kit with all the proper supplies — and that can be tricky if you’re not exactly sure what a well-stocked earthquake kit should contain. At BestReviews, we can help make the shopping process a little easier. We don’t accept products from manufacturers, so our recommendations are completely unbiased. We also conduct field and expert research to examine the top earthquake kits on the market more closely, which allows us to pass along all the info you need to choose the best kit for your family. Choose from our top picks, and for general info on choosing an earthquake kit, continue reading our shopping guide.

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Viral pathogens most often found in water are typically Hepatitis A, Norwalk and Rotovirus, all of which are smaller than most filters are incapable of trapping. They’re species specific which means human to human transmission, and all 3 are associated most often with fecal contamination, thus the further you get from population centers, the lower the risk becomes. For viral coverage, water purification is needed to kill the virus. Chlorine base chemicals are the best treatment next to boiling. UV pens and filter add-ons work good, but are not as effective as heat/chemical treatment. If you know the area you’re heading to, has a previous reputation of human traffic (like campgrounds), then avoid the UV treatment. If the area you’re in is not a high traffic area, UV is alright for use, but personally, I’d rather heat or chemically treat to be sure, and just bypass the expense and extra weight of a UV purifier.
For example, relatively near me recently there was a village evacuated from their homes for about a week due to a large damn above the village that was looking likely to burst as the damn wall started crumbling the torrential rain had the water at dangerous levels as it was. People who were home were given minutes to get their sh*t and leave while others were in work away from the danger zone and had zero chance to grab anything. For situations like these a mobile phone, charger, radio, batteries for headtorch etc are a completely rational and extremely likely to be heavily used while you get housed in a local community hall, leisure centre or school etc.
Non-perishable food. Don’t just get non-perishable food; look for “non-cook” items for your survival pack, as well. You don’t want to have to rely on a stove, fire, or any other cooking mechanism in an emergency situation. If you don’t have to cook, you don’t need cooking supplies, which means you can save space—and more importantly, weight—in your pack.
I may have been a bit dramatic in my response in cases, but mainly to show you the absurdity of the way you dramatically declare most of that useful kit should be discarded, as if you know best, as if you’ve been there done it, survived, worn the t-shirt, as if you think you’re come special forces commando that has survived behind enemy lines in every environment/climate the globe has to offer, totally ignoring the idiosyncrasies of each location around the world, for example you say knife .22 and “dump the rest”, because people living in an area with limited game but masses of water and fish to ditch their fishing line, hooks, weights etc for a .22… OK yea, I know who not to join up with in a disaster, the man carrying a f*cking sword to a gun fight
A Bug Out Bag, also called a BOB, I.N.C.H Bag (I’m Never Coming Home Bag),Get Out of Dodge Bag (GOOD Bag), or 72 Hour Bag is usually designed to get you out of an emergency situation and allow you to survive self-contained for up to 3 days. A lot of people plan their Bug Out Bag to sustain them for much longer than that, but there is always a limit to what you can carry on your back and a 3 day target is a good place to start.
Consider your family’s situation. How many people are in your family? Does anyone in your family need special consideration? Allergies? Medicine? Do you have an infant? All of these things will determine what you want to pack in your 72-hour survival kit. Keep in mind that your pack should be as minimal as possible—the more you pack, the heavier your 72-hour kit will be.
Cold weather gloves: A sturdy pair of gloves will provide you with better grip, protect your hands from cuts and splinters, offer warmth in low temperatures, and keeps your hands clean to reduce the risk of infection. In the aftermath of a disaster, you may be tasked with moving fallen branches, gathering firewood, or making your way through broken glass, and high-quality gloves will give you the dexterity to accomplish these tasks.
I you live an an area that gets cold, use a real back pack and not a bag so that you can carry a real sleeping bag and tent or tarp/mylar. Good luck out in freezing weather with a tube tent or space blanket! I have camped many nights in the snow and I have mostly done it with just a 9×9 mylar , tarp, and backpacking matris and sleeping bag. I think it would not be good at all with just a tube tent/space blanket that is on a lot of BOB lists.
The biggest misconception about bug out bags is the idea that the contents in and of themselves will be enough to keep you alive. The truth is that the contents of your bug out bag are only as good as the individual using them. If you don’t know how to make the most of the contents of your bug out bag or ration them appropriately, they won’t help you survive any more than a firearm without any ammunition. You should always take the time to familiarize yourself with the contents of your bug out bag and feel comfortable using everything so that you’re best prepared when TEOTWAWKI does occur.
They contain food rations and water as well as first aid gear and much more.  Making the decision to leave your home should be the last resort in an emergency. But if you have to, you’ll want one of these bags. We recommend having bug out rations and even buying extra ration packs and I’ve listed a great deal at the end of this report for food rations.

While you're working on gathering and storing supplies, visit our official blog for great ideas and to learn some useful skills. Our Emergency Essentials blog and articles provide top-notch emergency preparedness education. There's more great information available via our Facebook page to get you exactly what you need. You may think of "preppers" as people that aren't like you. But the truth is, most preppers are just everyday people planning ahead for unexpected circumstances with a bit of food storage, water storage, emergency power, and other supplies that will fulfill their basic needs if somehow their supply to their everyday source of supplies (like a grocery store) is unavailable for a while. Remember, survival isn't about luck. It's about prepping for difficult situations ahead of time, including the survival gear, emergency food storage, water storage, and the other supplies and skills you'll need in a disaster—whether a natural, personal, or financial disaster.
The Ready America bug out bag features a 107 piece first aid kit, survival blankets, emergency whistle and more, including 4 ‘food bars’. Since those food bars won’t get you very far the company, like many others, is counting on you to provide your own rations and that’s fine. There are plenty of places to purchase ready to eat, vacuum sealed meals as well as dehydrated food that you can stuff in the generously proportioned backpack. The backpack itself is well built, water resistant and easy on the shoulders. It can also be carried at your side using the convenient top handle. If you live in an area prone to hurricane strikes, tornadoes or flooding you owe it to yourself and your loved ones to invest in a bug out bag like this and keep it at the ready. It’s 100 bucks very well spent.
I have an idea , I read an article about pepper spray awhile back. In the article they discussed effective use of pepper spray and at end they made a suggestion that stuck with me. They suggested wasp spray instead of pepper spray because wasp spray will shoot up to 25′ or 50′ that gives you distance & distance could be very vital in survival. I am pretty sure a face full of wasp spray will stop someone especially since wasp spray foams. Just an idea plus it would serve two purposes.

Non-perishable food. Don’t just get non-perishable food; look for “non-cook” items for your survival pack, as well. You don’t want to have to rely on a stove, fire, or any other cooking mechanism in an emergency situation. If you don’t have to cook, you don’t need cooking supplies, which means you can save space—and more importantly, weight—in your pack.
If you have small children and the elderly with you, you might need 2 or 3 changes for accidents and diaper changes. Be sure also to include any extra diapers and diapering equipment you might need. Small children might revert to pre-potty trained days because they might be scared or you can’t make quick potty stops as often as they need them. It might be time to think about a portable potty, too, because restrooms might not be readily available.

While you're working on gathering and storing supplies, visit our official blog for great ideas and to learn some useful skills. Our Emergency Essentials blog and articles provide top-notch emergency preparedness education. There's more great information available via our Facebook page to get you exactly what you need. You may think of "preppers" as people that aren't like you. But the truth is, most preppers are just everyday people planning ahead for unexpected circumstances with a bit of food storage, water storage, emergency power, and other supplies that will fulfill their basic needs if somehow their supply to their everyday source of supplies (like a grocery store) is unavailable for a while. Remember, survival isn't about luck. It's about prepping for difficult situations ahead of time, including the survival gear, emergency food storage, water storage, and the other supplies and skills you'll need in a disaster—whether a natural, personal, or financial disaster.
Non-perishable food. Don’t just get non-perishable food; look for “non-cook” items for your survival pack, as well. You don’t want to have to rely on a stove, fire, or any other cooking mechanism in an emergency situation. If you don’t have to cook, you don’t need cooking supplies, which means you can save space—and more importantly, weight—in your pack.
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