What is a 72-hour kit? It is a kit (sometimes referred to as a Go Bag) in a backpack or tote that allows you to live away from your home for up to 3-4 days in an emergency. It is different from a Bug Out Bag (BOB) as a B.O.B. is meant for the possibility of permanently living away from home. Your 72-hour kit is intended to allow you to escape an immediate threat, live for 3 (or 4 if you stretch it) days without relying on authorities or going back home (though sometimes, home won’t be an option if it is bad enough and that BOB will be a blessing).
Great information. But, please don’t tell people that pepper spray will drop someone in seconds. I was a chemical agent instructor for a medium size police department. I’ve been sprayed by a lot of stuff. Not all of it works on every person. I’ve seen people just sit there and look at you when they were hit full in the face with very good, very reliable chemical agents. We only taught that it was a distraction technique. Use the chemical agent to distract the person so you can hit them next, take them down, flee, whatever your plan is. But, it is only a distraction technique.
BePrepared.com is the world's largest dedicated online marketplace for survival food, water, and gear. They're a complete one-stop shop for everything you need to prepare for emergencies. There's no way to be ready for everything, but BePrepared.com can get you pretty darn close. Preparing for your survival needs in a disaster can seem daunting, but if you follow a simple plan, you'll be prepared before you know it.
When creating your plan, make sure that it can be used for the many different worst-case scenarios that can happen. Take a look at the different types of disasters that are likely to happen in your area and make sure you have a deep multi-scenario plan for each.Some people fall into the trap where they think that they are prepared, but it's been so long since they have checked in on that plan that they really don't remember it, or circumstances have changed that make it important to change your plan. For instance, you may have some food stored up, but have you checked the expiration dates lately?

The Deluxe 3-Day Emergency Preparedness Kit is approved by the American Red Cross Scientific Advisory Council. The American Red Cross Scientific Advisory Council, a volunteer committee of nationally recognized health care, aquatics, preparedness and educational professionals, helps establish and assure the scientific basis for Red Cross programs, products and public guidance. Council members’ contributions help ensure that the Red Cross is using the latest science, addressing current needs and is preparing for future changes.
I agree less is more. Use two contractor refuse bags sandwiched together with leaves and moss in between the layers will make a good sleeping bag, floats for river crossings.water storage etc. Not so detectable on ir, properly camouflaged. Thermal a whole different story. The Oath Keepers site has instructions for a thermal evasion cloak. With a little bit of tweaking it will make a very warm and snug sleeping bag. So if evasion from thermal is a concern this might be a solution. It can be used as poncho, lean to, and rain fly. For survival needs I carry .22 with subsonic 1000 fps thereabouts and a silencer. The sound signature is that of a click of the firing pin. For motion detection $ 9.99 motion detector from Harbor Freight, they come in white, mask and and paint black avoiding the white detector cover.
I like your addition of a bug net. One thing I noticed is that the author correctly says to save space and weight to just pack a tarp. However, where I live, from late May to late September if you don’t pack bug netting, a tent with screens or plenty of bug spray you are going to be itchy, sore and tired from no sleep because you are up all night swatting mosquitoes

Look for a pack that has multiple compartments, with pockets and organizers built in to help keep track of the small items, and try to pack your BOB strategically with items grouped that you’ll use together. Remember to pack clothes and bulky items on the bottom and heavier items at the top for better weight distribution and to ease the strain on your body.  
Backpack. One of the more common mistakes for 72-hour kits starts with the backpack. Choose a backpack that has multiple compartments in which you can divide your survival gear. Sifting through an unorganized pack, where everything is jumbled into the same large compartment can be frustrating and time consuming. By subdividing your stuff into different pockets you can access what you need quickly. Amazon has a variety of military-style packs to choose from.
2 black backpacks. 5 ziplock bags. Waterproof document holder. 4 Reflective sleeping bags. 4 adult ponchos. 2 x two person tents. 4 Hand warmers. 4 3600 calorie bars. 24 4.2 oz. water pouches. 5 x 1 Litre water purification powder. Folding water container (1 litre). Water purification instructions. Dynamo AM/FM radio/phone charger/flashlight. 4 Light-sticks. 61 piece First Aid kit.
Cold Steel shovel, Crunch multitool with saw blades, lockaid “gun”, 2 qts of water, (depending upon the area) 1 plastic canteen, one plastic canteen, water filter, water treatment pills/fluids, 2 canteen cups, medical kit (to include tape and condoms) firekit, heavy-duty trekking poles, Kindle reader with survival info, “shaker” AA light with Campmor headband to hold it, keychain led light, 2 lbs of rations (almond butter, Tang, instant oatmeal, powdered Gatorade, spices, Day pack, OD green socks, underwear, sleeping/shelter gear (5 lbs) about 5 lbs of clothing/boots(beyond what you’d wear to the office) NVD goggles, about 25 lbs. 3 lbs of soft armor, 2 lbs of pistol and ammo, and possibly another 12 lbs of autorifle, silencer, scope and ammo.
What I will do is recommend that you build your own First Aid Kit instead of buying one of those prepackaged first aid kits that claim to have 1001 things to get you through any emergency. While some are ok, in my experience these types of kits are usually filled with a lot of stuff you are unlikely to need and not enough of the things you will probably need a lot of.
I wanted a 4 season shelter/sleep setup that was 5 lbs or less, very compact, is not effected by geting wet, all of it being capable of being worn as a poncho. What I came up with was a highly modified Escape bivvy, a bag made out of a 6×8 PEVA shower curtain, a bag made out of a pair of casualty blankets, a bugnet bag. I used velcro to create a seall the way around the Escape. I added a removable hood, with drawstring and another drawstring at the neck. I made the bivvy a foot longer and 6″ wider at the shoulder. I created the other bags by installing a snap every 5″, all the way around and by sewing (1 edge only) a 3/4″ wide strip of muslin sheet. These strips “tangle” and hold in body heat really well. The casualty bag is stiff enough to serve as a pack frame, letting me save weight and money in my pick of backpack. The shoulder straps and hip belt can be padded with dark socks and underwear. This again lets me save weight and pack cost. My hammock is made out of monofilament gillnet, minus the lead weights, becomes a hammock via the muletapeThe bugnet bag is of course
*Service Guarantee Terms and Conditions: Requests must be authorized and/or paid for before 12:00pm, Monday-Friday to qualify for same day service. Requests received after 12pm (Monday-Thursday) will have service provided by 5pm the following day. Same day service guarantee does not apply on requests received after 12:00pm on Friday. Same day service not available on Saturday or Sunday.
×